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St. Patrick’s Day Decorating Ideas

Get ideas for bringing the St. Patrick’s Day celebration into your home with these creative St. Patrick’s Day decorating ideas!

St. Patrick's Day vignette with a vintage postcard, gold pitcher, and a plant in a milk glass vase.

I had so much fun decoration my formal living room St. Patrick’s Day and I’m excite to share how I decorated with you.

St. Patrick’s Day Decorating Ideas

Here is our living room decked out for St. Patrick’s Day.

Sherman is the family member who enjoys this room the most. You can see by the color of his white fur sofa cover that he spends a lot of time relaxing on “his” sofa.

Formal Living Room Decorated for St. Patrick's Day

St. Patrick’s Day Mantel

I recently shared our St. Patrick’s Day mantel. If you missed that post, be sure to check it out to see all of the interesting vintage St. Patrick’s Day postcards that I used to decorate it.

St. Patrick’s Day Vignettes

After I decorated the mantel, I moved on to creating St. Patrick’s Day vignettes.

The first one that I created was this one using a faux plant in a vintage hobnob milk glass planter, a gold pitcher marked 14K, and an antique St. Patrick’s Day postcard.

St. Patrick's Day vignette with a vintage postcard, gold pitcher, and a plant in a milk glass vase.

I used one of my grandmother’s flower frogs to display the postcard and accented the frog with an antique clover pin that either was my grandmother’s or belonged to one of her aunts.

Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard

I inherited a bunch of costume jewelry from my grandmother and great-great-aunts. You can the jewelry in this post.

Back of a St. Patrick's Day vintage postcard

This postcard was never mailed. I believe this postcard to be from my mother’s side of the family. Mama lives in the 1912 home where Maggie grew up.

When I share my family room, Maggie’s framed sheet music is one of the walls.

I created another St. Patrick’s Day vignette on the music stand to the left of our fireplace.

Antique St. Patrick's Day postcard, pipe and tobacco box, candle on a candle holder with a green clover pin glued to it.

I glued a clover bolo tie clasp to a white candle to coordinate with the postcard.

My dad was very active in 4-H as was I and also my grandmother. I think this clover was part of a bolo tie that my dad wore. I also have two of his 4-H jackets.

Antique St. Patrick's Day postcard and a candle on a candle holder with a green clover pin glued to it.

When I shared my St. Patrick’s Day mantel, I shared what Irish expressions such as Erin Go Bragh means.

The signature at the bottom of the card says Ellen H Clapsaddle. I looked her up and found this:

Ellen Hattie Clapsaddle was an American illustrator/commercial artist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard

If you like my Erin Go Bragh Ellen H. Clapsaddle postcard, I found an identical one for sale on Etsy.

This postcard was sent to my great-great-aunt in 1910.

Back of a Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard

Since the postcard has a pipe illustration, I displayed it with my maternal grandfather’s pipe and tobacco box.

Antique St. Patrick's Day postcard, pipe and tobacco box, candle on a candle holder with a green clover pin glued to it.

Decor on the Chest of Drawers

A spot that I always decorate seasonally is on my grandmother’s chest.

Antique chest of drawers decorated for St. Patrick's Day

In the center of the display is my Indiana milk glass fruit centerpiece bowl.

St. Patrick's Day vignette with a milk glass compote filled with split peas, ferns, a mushroom, and a vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard

I filled the bowl with slit peas, then added a mushroom, ferns, bark, and a leather postcard that my great-great-aunt received in 1906.

St. Patrick's Day vignette with a milk glass compote filled with split peas, ferns, a mushroom, and a vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard

You can see scanned copies of all of my antique St. Patrick’s Day postcards in this post.

To the right of the fruit bowl, I decorated with a green jug filled with faux pussy willow and another antique postcard. The Magnolia leaves are from Williamsburg and are coated in a thin coat of painted metal.

St. Patrick's Day vignette with a milk glass compote, green bottle with pussy willow, and a vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard

This postcard was sent to my great-great-aunt in 1908 from my other great-great-aunt who raised my grandmother.

Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard

Apparently 1908 was a Leap Year and Fannie thought it would bring her luck with finding a boyfriend.

Back of a vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard

On the left side of the dresser, I decorated using two vintage green glass bowls.

St. Patrick's Day vignette with a milk glass compote filled with split peas, ferns, a mushroom, and a vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard and two green glass compotes

The bowl on the left is an Indiana Glass Green Lotus bowl that I found a long time ago at Goodwill. I filled it with corks.

The bowl on the right originally had a lid. It is also an Indiana Glass piece. I filled it with polished stones that my grandmother told me came from the Celanese plant in Narrows, Virginia. I added a silver clover to the stones.

Green glass candy dishes filled with wine corks and polished stones

Dining Room St. Patrick’s Day Decor

The dining room is decorated for St. Patrick’s Day with this display.

Antique chest decorated for St. Patrick's Day

The flower arrangement is a refreshed one that Mr. SP brought home to me after my surgery. The original arrangement was for Valentine’s Day.

A week after Valentine’s Day, I pulled out the flowers that had died and filled in the empty spaces with ferns and other greenery from flowers that a friend brought to me.

Antique lamp, antique green and gold pitcher, flower arrangement with daisies and ferns

Granny left notes in a lot of her things which is so handy because I love reading them to know the history.

Fannie, whose name you see on some of my vintage postcards, raised my grandmother. She was married to Frederick Dodenhoff who Granny called Uncle Dodie. Fannie and Dodie acted like grandparents to my dad and both he and my aunt also called them what Granny called them, Aunt Fannie and Uncle Dodie.

The note in this pitcher says: “Uncle Dodie brought this pitcher to Marguerite Brown from a trip to Spanish American War Vets, Oregon, I think. She gave it to me before she died.

Antique lamp, antique green and gold pitcher, flower arrangement with daisies and ferns, and a vintage green and gold box

I am eager for my aunt to read this post to tell me who Marguerite Brown was.

My grandmother’s name was Marguerite, so perhaps this is a relative.

The box in the middle of the table was also my grandmother’s.

Vintage green and gold box

St. Patrick’s Day Decorations on the Porch

I went all out for St. Patrick’s Day this year and even decorated the porch.

For this vignette, I decorated with an antique lamp used to hold a green candle, a hobnob milk glass ashtray filled with coffee beans, and a St. Patrick’s Day free printable in a vintage frame.

Irish you a happy st. patrick's day free printable, milk glass ashtray filled with coffee beans, antique lamp used as a candle holder

The last St. Patrick’s Day vignette to share is this one on a table on our enclosed porch.

The glass surrounding the candle was originally a sconce in the farmhouse where my grandfather grew up. (See the farmhouse in this post as well as this one.) The candle base was my grandmother’s.

Czech green pitcher, antique green glass bowl, shade from an oil lantern decorated with a candle

The green glass bowl was my grandmother’s and she wove a basket over it in bible school when she was a child.

The pitcher was also my grandmother’s and is marked, “Made in Czechoslovakia.”

Czech green pitcher, antique green glass bowl, shade from an oil lantern decorated with a candle

I’ll leave you with a funny story. The bowl filler in the green bowl is from the early 90s and originally was scented. One Thanksgiving my father-in-law was at my mother’s house and she had a bowl filled with this on the counter in the kitchen. My father-in-law ate some of it thinking that it was candy or some sort of snack. I don’t know what it really is but I do know that it isn’t poisonous.

I hope you got some St. Patrick’s Day decorating ideas and that you enjoyed seeing my decorations and reading the history behind my decor.

21 Comments

  1. Love all the little shamrocks. I looked around my house for GREEN things and I’m stunned that I have NOTHING. And about that first postcard that looks like it was not mailed – some people just inserted postcards into an envelope, believe it or not. I know that seems contrary to the point of a postcard but that’s what some people did. Maybe they didn’t want the message out there for the world to see.

    1. Thank you for educating me on the postcards not having a stamp or postmark. I had no idea that people sent them in envelopes. Perhaps they sent a letter along with the postcard?

  2. WOW!! Paula, I LOVE LOVE everything you have decorated with in your lovely home. I’m new here and I just love your home, decorating ideas, etc. I am going digging in my “stuff” today because I have some of the things you used. I have family jewelry, my grandfather’s pipe, gold & brass & copper things I can decorate with. Thank you for your inspiration. I live in Manassas and know Roanoke well. I lived in Blacksburg and met my husband at Va Tech. Anyway, I want you to know I am keeping you in my prayers as you go through this terrible cancer. I had Leukemia as a child (was in MCV Hosp. 1968). God bless you and thank you for your wonderful website. 😊❤

    1. I am so happy that you discovered my blog, Donna, and I’m happy that my post was an inspiration to you to decorate for St. Patrick’s Day. I am sorry that you had to go through Leukemia as a child but happy that you survived and have lived a good life. I’m also a Hokie as was my dad. He graduated in 1962 and I graduated in 1991. I’m eager to visit the campus again. When I was still teaching, I went on a field trip there each spring with the shop class at my school. It was amazing to see how the campus changed from year to year. I believe my last visit was 2016.

      Paula

    1. Thank you so much, Linda! I had a lot of fun decorating for St. Patrick’s Day and then sharing on my blog.

  3. Enjoyed this post and as usual the history behind all your pieces and postcards. Your home is so lovely and you have such a gift for decorating. Have a great day!

    1. Thank you so much, Lynda! It’s fun for me to shop my house to find things to use for decorating for each season.

  4. Such a lovely post, Paula. You included all of my favorite things: treasures from your family, carefully and artfully arranged, and lots of history. Interesting and beautiful!
    Yay! 😀 So happy that your prescription is on it’s way! I will continue to pray for your needs. God answers prayer!
    Have a wonderful day!
    Blessings always,
    Suzanne

    1. Thank you so much, Suzanne! I had fun decorating this room for St. Patrick’s Day. It was a huge relief on Monday when I found out that my prescription could be refilled. I so much appreciate your support and prayers.

  5. Hi Paula, I enjoyed your St. Patrick’s Day Decorations. I also enjoy (and am a bit envious of!) your cool family stories. I never knew any of my grandparents. But the reason I’m commenting: Did you know that four leaf clovers and shamrocks are different? The Shamrock is a three-leaf clover, a type of trefoil plant, which has been considered the unofficial national flower of Ireland for centuries. The shamrock was chosen as Ireland’s national emblem because of the legend that St. Patrick had used it to illustrate the doctrine of the Trinity. The Trinity is the idea that God is really three-in-one: The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit. The shamrock is one clover, divided into three parts, just like the Triune God. [From https://time.com/5550579/shamrock-history/ and https://english-zone.com/holidays/st-patsymbols.html} So, while it’s fun to use the four leaf clovers, which some consider “lucky”, they are different from a shamrock. There’s your history lesson for the day. 🙂 Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

  6. Hi Paula,

    It was so fun to read this post, such unique and pretty vignettes. And thank you, God, for your blessings for Paula! My daily prayers continue for you.

    Sue

    1. I know that all of the support and prayers that my readers are sending me are helping me so much. I was so grateful when I found out that my medication was being refilled. I’ll relax after the UPS man delivers it today and it’s in my hands.

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